FAQ

Q: Who are you?

A: My name is Janet Munin, and I am a devotional polytheist, writer, spiritual director, and priestess. I hold a Master of Arts in Comparative Religion from the University of Washington, where I wrote my thesis on sacred prostitution in the ancient and modern worlds, and then completed two years of graduate work at Seattle University’s School of Theology and Ministry. I am ordained as a priestess by the Ordo Arcanorum Gradalis (a Christo-Pagan Fellowship of the Holy Grail), and hold a Second Degree initiation in an underworld tradition as a priestess of Ereshkigal. For two years I was the facilitator of the Sacred Sexuality Meetup at Seattle’s Center for Sex Positive Culture.

As a “hard” polytheist, I believe that the gods are as individual and distinct as we are, not simply “aspects” of a One God or Goddess. I have devotional relationships with Ereshkigal, Odin, Elen of the Ways, Inanna, Freya, Tyr, Yeshua, and Mary Magdalene.

I am the editor of Queen of the Great Below, An Anthology in Honor of Ereshkigal, published by Bibliotheca Alexandrina.

Q: Why “Feral” Abbey?

A:  “Feral” means something was once tame or domesticated but is now free. I adopted the term years ago when I realized that no matter how many gifts any one spiritual path may offer, I could not limit myself to one.

It also refers to the fact that the Holy Powers can not be contained by our limited human perspectives, theologies and creeds. They will always be bigger, wilder, more powerful, and more amazing than we will ever be able to comprehend. They will always defy our instinctive attempts to ‘domesticate’ Them to accommodate our personal comfort.

Q: Where do you get the title “Abbess”?

A: I chose it because I felt called to create and maintain a place which would be dedicated to the gods and offer hospitality to spiritual seekers. “Abbey” is one of many names for such a place, and since I founded this one, I am Abbess by default. The title indicates my commitment to this path and this place.

Q: Isn’t spiritual direction a Christian thing?

A: Like most spiritual practices, spiritual direction is something which transcends any one tradition. It originated in the monastic communities of both East and West, but in the last few decades it has become popluar among lay people who are looking for one-on-one support in their spiritual lives.

 

Still have questions? Contact me and I’ll get right back to you!